Whitespace (programming language)

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For those without comedic tastes, the so-called experts at Wikipedia think they have an article about Whitespace (programming language).
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Creators Edwin Brady and Chris Morris

Whitespace is an esoteric programming language, designed by Edwin Brady and Chris Morris at the University of Durham. It has many advanced features which make it more flexible, while also being more minimal. But alas, the amount of time spent watching TV all day and not eating enough carrots means that humans no longer have the ability to read the language. Due to the esoteric nature of the language, only those with eyes that have evolved to see ultraviolet radiation are able to read the code.

The language is popular among trendy young programmers who like for not only their interface to be clean, but their code too. Popular IDEs include Notepad, Emacs as well as the typewriter. Bjarne Stroustrup dabbles in this language when he isn't busy sprinkling strange characters over anything he can find; but his coding style is often not very readable due to the lack of frequent Whitespace. Bjarne is, however, progressing through code academy in an effort to remedy this.

edit General Gist of It

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edit History of Whitespace

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edit Whitespace and How You Use it on a Daily Basis

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edit Some Examples

Hello World:

 

A simple online chat program:

 






The algorithm that Julian Assange used to alter NASA satellite orbits:

 








An algorithm which can either cure cancer or prove that P = NP depending on what the processor feels like doing:

 
















































edit Some Final Words

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(Note: Spaces and Tabs will be provided once wiki programming is smart enough to detect them.

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