User:Guildensternenstein/Harold Rosenbaum

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Harold Rosenbaum has worked with the likes of Ravel, Schnittke, Henze, Berio, Perle, Harbison, The New York Philharmonic, The Julliard Orchestra, The New York Virtuosso Singers, Bang on a Can, and The Mark Morris Dance Group, to name a few.

Harold Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—is one of the most accomplished and critically acclaimed choral conductors of our time. He is the winner of the 2008 American Composer Alliance's Laurel Leaf Award, given in recognition of “distinguished achievement in fostering and encouraging American music.” Among the recipients of the Laurel Leaf have been the Juilliard String Quartet, Leonard Slatkin, Leopold Stokowski, George Szell, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Also, in recognition of his leadership in the interpretation and performance of contemporary music, G. Schirmer, Inc.the world's largest music publisher—has established its Harold Rosenbaum Choral Series, for which he composes, edits, and gives performance suggestions for conductors.

A tireless proponent and advocate for contemporary composers and American composers in particular, Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—has created an annual choral composition competition, has commissioned twenty five works, has conducted over 250 world premiers (including works by Ravel, Schnittke, Henze, Berio, Perle, and Harbison), and has recorded contemporary choral music for SONY Classical, Albany, CRI, Bridge, Koch International, Capstone, and DRG. He is also a three-time recipient of the ASCAP/Chorus America Award for Adventuresome Programming of Contemporary Music, and a recipient of Chorus America's American Choral Works Performance Award.

edit The Man

Mr. Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—is a much sought after guest conductor, clinician, adjudicator, funding panelist, coach, lecturer, consultant, and educator. He has taught at four universities including The Julliard School.

Currently he is Associate Professor at the University at Buffalo/SUNY. Mr. Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—has collaborated with such composers as David Del Tredici, Stephen Schwartz, John Adams, Ned Rorem, Charles Wourinen, Peter Shickele, Augusta Read Thomas, David Lang, and Michael Gordon. He has also worked with actors Tony Randall, F. Murray Abraham, Werner Kemperer and Michael York, stage directors Jonathan Miller and Francois Girard, DJ Spooky, and recently with legendary film composer Ennio Morricone and The Roma Sinfonietta in concerts in the General Assembly of the United Nations and at Radio City.

edit The Dream

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Rosenbaum conducting The New York Virtuosso Singers, on a night where they performed works by Handel, J.S. Bach, J.P.Q Bach, and J.C. Bach.

To fulfill his dream of conducting the most complex and masterful choral compositions of the 20th century, Mr. Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—established The New York Virtuoso Singers, an all-professional choir now in its 21st season.

The New York Virtuoso Singers is regularly invited to perform with leading orchestras, and at prestigious institutions such as The Tanglewood Music Festival and The Julliard School. It has premiered over 200 works by composers such as Luciano Berio, John Harbison, Hans Werner Henze, Louis Andriessen, Shulamit Ran, George Perle, Ernst Krenek, Thea Musgrave, Jonathan Harvey, Arvo Part, Andrew Inbrie, and many others.

Prior to the formation of The New York Virtuoso Singers, Mr. Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—had already established his all-volunteer choir, The Canticum Novum Singers, as one of New York's best premiere choirs presenting the music of all periods, with a special focus on early music. The Canticum Novum Singers have presented over 450 concerts in this country, and gone on four European tours. This choir has premiered over 60 compositions by composers such as Handel, J.S. Bach, Faure, Bruchner, Harbison, Berio, Schnittke, Rorem, Schickele, and George Benjamin.

edit The World

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An example of a collection of Rosenbaum's concert work. This particular volume features works by Ravel, Schnittke, Henze, Berio, Perle, and Harbison, to name a few.

Throughout Europe, Mr. Rosenbaum—who definitely didn’t write this himself—has conducted close to 100 concerts, working with the Budapest Symphony Orchestra, L'Orchestre d'Europe, the New Prague Collegium, the Madeira Bach Festival Orchestra, and choirs from the USA and France. Appearances include The Ludlow Festival and Cheltenham Fringe Festival in England, The Madeira Bach Festival in Portugal, and The Siracusa Festival in Italy.

In this country, Mr. Rosenbaum has collaborated over 100 times with leading orchestras such as the New York Philharmonic with James Conlon, The Brooklyn Philharmonic with Robert Spano, Lukas Foss, Dennis Russell Davies, Michael Christie, and Grant Llewellyn, The American Symphony with Leon Botstein, The American Composers Orchestra with Seven Sloane, the Riverside Symphony with George Rothman, The Orchestra of St. Luke's with Sir Charles Mackerras, plus The Julliard Orchestra, concerto Koln, The Bard Festival Orchestra, the Westchester Symphony, and many others.

He has also collaborated with The Paul Taylor Dance Company, Continuum, P.D.Q. Bach in Carnegie Hall and Avery Fisher Hall, with The Mark Morris Dance Group, Bang on a Can, The Glyndebourne Opera Company, S.E.M. Ensemble, Da Capo Chamber Players, The New York Youth Symphony, and The Bel Canto Opera Company.

Mr. Rosenbaum's choirs have performed many times on Lincoln Center's Great Performances Series, and have appeared on the David Letterman Show, and in concerts with Ames Galway, Tony Bennett, Licia Albanese, Marianne Faithful, Leonard Slatkin, and The Linclon Center Chamber Music Society. He has appeared countless times on radio and TV, including an annual national broadcast of an episode of CBS TV's 48 Hours entitled The Mystery of the Nativity.


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