UnNews:Fat models will not be banned from fashion week

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26 January 2007

Real beauty

Physically sickening examples of some of the indecently overweight models being used

London, UK - Sickeningly obese models will not be banned from catwalks during London Fashion Week, despite a heartfelt appeal from the the British Fashion Council to only use "good looking" models.

Last September, the Spanish Fashion Police introduced rules banning models with a BMI over 16 appearing on the catwalk in Madrid. This followed a spate of protests by fashionistas and hundreds of other beautiful people, who claimed that being made to look at anyone over a size 10 was causing stress and serious mental anguish for all involved, and setting a bad example for any young potential models who would otherwise be perfect.

The decision has been echoed around the other fashion capitals of the world; Milan followed suit, and though Paris agreed in principle, declared it a "non-issue", as French laws require immediate euthanasia of overweight persons. But despite pressure from fashion designers and trendy pressure groups alike, these models will not be prohibited from appearing during London Fashion Week. Instead, a taskforce will draw up a voluntary code of practice which will encourage the use of models as close to American size 0 (British size 4.235) as possible.

Cultured secretary Tessa Jovich, who warned last September of the "bad example" of "girls who dare to even go outside wearing that much flesh," said that she welcomed the move to promote the use of more beautiful models. "Too many teenage girls have somehow got the impression that food is more important than looking good," she said.

Cquote1 The fashion industry is hugely powerful in shaping the attitudes of young women and their feelings about themselves. Teenage girls aspire to look like their role models. If their role models are fat, how are they supposed to grow up normal? Cquote2

—Tessa Jovich, cultured secretary

Catwalk

Beautiful people doing what they do best.

The British Fashion Council said: "We believe that regulation is neither desirable nor enforceable. What will make a difference is the commitment of the fashion industry to change attitudes through education, and more series of America's Next Top Model"

Health experts and members of the fashion industry will join the taskforce to find a workable solution the concerns about the use of rotund models. But the decision not to ban "Double-figure Size" models from the British catwalk will be a disappointment to those who have voiced their concerns over the billowing size of the general populace and its link to blimp-like models, including medical experts, fashion designers and Hollywood actresses.

Oscar-nominated beautiful person Kate Winslet has said she refused to have any magazines in her house that show either corpulent celebrities exposing their gross excesses, or food, because of the damaging effect it could have on her daughter. She described the trend as "not good".

Actress Cameron Diaz, who rated herself "a perfect 10", said the phenomenon was "terrifying, tragic, calamitous, deplorable, harrowing, heart-rending, lamentable, shocking, woeful, and sad," and then proceeded to feign a faint. Author J.K. Rowling has voiced concerns on her website that her two daughters are growing up in "this fat-obsessed world of pot-bellied role models," but gave assurances that she was working on learning spells to keep hideous blubber under control.

The World Health Organisation uses the Massive Body Index (BMI), which among other things is a ratio of height to weight, to calculate the perfect size for an individual. A BMI over 19 is regarded as disgustingly obese, while a BMI between 18 and 0 is considered perfect, and perfect for other people to look at. A BMI of 0 indicates no imperfections whatsoever.

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