Toungby

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Toungby, a shortened form of "tongue-rugby," is a simple game invented in Portland, Oregon. It is played between two persons (usually two persons who know each other at least moderately well), and has been described as "one part contest of skill, one part foreplay, and one part blood sport."

The rules of toungby are as follows:

  1. There are two players. One more than one, one less than three: two.
  2. Only one (1) game may be played per 24-hour period, demarcation of said period commonly being at midnight local time.
  3. The game is played to a score of ten (10) points.
  4. Points may be scored in one of two fashions:
    a. When the tongue of one player has contact with the nose of the other player, the first player scores one (1) point.
    b. When the tongue of one player penetrates, to any degree, the umbilicus ("belly-button") of the other player, the first player scores three (3) points.
    c. "Grand slams" are now illegal.
  5. When a point is scored, the scoring player must call out the current score (e.g., "five - three!") in order for the point to be valid.
  6. There are no further rules.

Variations on these rules exist, however. Detroit Rules (counterintuitively) make the game slightly more "humanitarian," stipulating that if midnight is reached and neither player has scored ten points, the player with the most points wins, and a new game may not be started until the players awake the next morning. However, Detroit Rules also potentially allow for more than one game to be played within a 24-hour period.

Seattle rules, meanwhile, provide for tag team toungby, where players compete two-on-one or two-on-two. Only one player from each team may be in play at any time, players exchange by slapping hands, and points are cumulative for teams, rather than individuals. Certain factions in the toungby community regard Seattle rules as "not fair."

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