Talk:Subtlety

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Revision as of 08:38, November 24, 2007 by 99.236.127.59 (talk)

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Isn't it spelled sublety? --Nintendorulez 12:42, 31 Oct 2005 (UTC)

Not according to dictionary.com  :). I actually took the time to look it up first, because I wasn't positive myself. Subliminal messages also redirects here.

I wonder how many people will catch all of hidden things in the article. There's seven different types used. Rei 17:24, 31 Oct 2005 (UTC)

I haven't caught any of the hidden things in the article. This makes me feel ignorant and frustrated. ninebucks 18:18, 31 Dec 2005 (UTC)

This is what I found:

  1. "In history, among the most infamous uses of subtilty was that of the Roman emperor Caligula. Little do many know that Caligula was in fact quite sane" - implies Caligula was insane;
  2. "In a praiseworthy piece of subtilty, the pope-to-be spoke loudly to the using innoculous words that didn't clue in the beast. Deep within the sentences, however, the woodsman caught that the first letter of each sentence combined to spell out a request for help. Entrusting his fate to the boy, the woodsman charged the jabberwock, who released the boy to turn and fight. Now freed, Sixtus drew his mighty vorpal blade, and snicker-snack, the creature died." - The woodsman didn't actually use the prayer.
  3. Redlink destinations in the "Present Day" section combine into the following: "Leave Your Husband Practice Witchcraft Destroy Capitalism And Become Lesbians Destroy Families And Convert Their Children To Hedonism".
  4. The "Controversy" section is full of misspellings, but they don't seemto form any intelligible text.

- Guest 18:51, 31 Dec 2005 (UTC)

Highlight the text and you'll see two other things. --—rc (t) 18:55, 31 Dec 2005 (UTC)

Just to let you know: it's certainly not impossible  :) Esty found all but one type of subtilty by himself.

Guest: Your first two entries are missing the subtilty in that section. Apply the code used by Sixtus and the Woodsman to the section itself. Your third entry was right on  :) Your fourth entry is close - try again, looking only at inserted letters, and make sure you get them all!

Rcmurphy is correct as well. -- Rei 21:16, 2 Jan 2006 (UTC)

  • The first section produces "KILLTHEPRESIDENT", the last section produces "baalisnowyoeurmastersokillsomeone". I presume the "e" in "booiles" shouldn't be there. - Guest 06:47, 3 Jan 2006 (UTC)

"Sat..", "Praise...........................", "Kill............", "Leave.....................................................", "Baal...........................", "Dem.." and "Luc...."?

If that's all then are the following mistakes?

Claudius was the successor to Caligula. Caligula inherited from Tiberius.

"the pope-to-be spoke loudly to the using innoculous words" seems to be missing the word "woodsman" and is innoculous a misspelling of innocuous?

This page is so subtle I can't tell if these are errors or deliberate! --99.236.127.59 08:38, 24 November 2007 (UTC)

edit I did look up the spelling...

2 entries found for subtlety. sub·tle·ty Audio pronunciation of "subtlety" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (stl-t) n. pl. sub·tle·ties

  1. The quality or state of being subtle.
  2. Something subtle, especially a nicety of thought or a fine distinction.

is what dictionary.com says.

So did I, at dictionary.com:
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=subtilty
2 entries found for subtilty.
sub·tile P Pronunciation Key (stl, sbtl)
adj. Subtle.
[Middle English, from Old French subtil, from Latin subtlis, fine, delicate. See subtle.]
subtile·ly adv.
sub·tili·ty (sb-tl-t) or subtile·ness (stl-ns, sbtl-) or subtil·ty (stl-t, sbtl-) n.
-- Rei 15:53, 17 February 2006 (UTC)

edit I propose that the spelling be changed to "subtlety"

To present my case, I give you these links:

As you can see, the "subtle" and "subtlety" spellings are far more widespread. The ration of "subtlety" over "subtilty" is over 5 to 1, and the ratio of "subtle" vs. "subtile" is over 17 to 1. Also:

  • this shows that the word "subtile" is used more to mean hard-to-grasp physical things, while "subtle" is more often used to mean things like conversation, etc.
  • Shakespeare used "subtile" as often as "subtle" - but that was then. The word originally came from the French "soutile", and the spelling slowly changed. The correct pronounciation nowadays is "sah-tl" not "sah-tayl". Esn 10:21, 15 December 2006 (UTC)
I'm not attached to this spelling, so if you want to change it, feel free. -- Rei 18:13, 15 December 2006 (UTC)
Done. :) Esn 08:45, 8 March 2007 (UTC)
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