Talk:Saint Frankenstein's Day

From Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This is about the most clever idea I've seen on this site. -- Kip > Talk Works Puzzle Potato Dry Brush CUN Icons-flag-us

Truly a great artaclee --Moneke 10:25, 25 November 2007 (UTC)

This is so unfunny it's not even funny. -- Gay2.gifCartoonDiabloGay2.gif

It isn't funny that you don't find it funny that the article is funny. Huuum! Funny! User:Frankenstein

What the hell are you talking about? -- Kip > Talk Works Puzzle Potato Dry Brush CUN Icons-flag-us

edit From Pee Review

edit Saint Frankenstein's Day

El Zoof's idea, I've reworked it some. Bearing in mind that I know the pictures suck, what do you think? --Cap'n Sir Ben GUN WotM VFH VFP 07:09, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

Humour: 7 I love the running of the monsters.
Concept: 9 This is a really, really good idea.
Prose and formatting: 7 I would cast the conversation between God and Pope Pius as script-type dialogue rather than quote templates. There are a few places I feel that the prose would benefit from a bit of tightening.
Images: 8 Love the brain-valentine. Yeah, the face on the martyr could be matched to the pasty skin-tones of the rest of the painting better. But overall the images are nice.
Miscellaneous: 8 I really like this idea.
Final Score: 39
Reviewer: ----OEJ 15:39, 15 May 2007 (UTC)


Endnotes: I might humbly suggest a few joke enhancements.

"In the late 1700s, mad science was suffering under persecution the likes of which had not been seen in weeks."

Yes, but there's perhaps there's a joke left hanging: the sentence implies that there were other instances of persecution.

"In the late 1700s, mad science was suffering under persecution the likes of which had not been seen in weeks -- not since Pope Gorgo Brutalis IV threw Guiseppe Frangipani in the pokey for insisting that toast could, conceivably, fall buttered side up without the aid of God."

Maybe. There are much better ideas for silly instances of persecution, that's a pretty crappy one. (I am coming to dislike offering good examples in some instances because I suspect that I am somehow robbing authors of their creative gold.)

"This came to an end after Baron Victor von Trapp Frankenstein was martyred by the Ignorant Townsfolk on Februrary 14th, 1799."

Likewise: the reader naturally yearns to know the details of Baron Frankenstein's martyrdom. A short paragraph spent scratching the reader's itch would be verbiage well spent, I think.

This is well worth working on. Good luck with it.

----OEJ 15:39, 15 May 2007 (UTC)

Personal tools
projects