Onomatopoeia

From Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia

Revision as of 10:16, August 8, 2010 by Sockpuppet of an unregistered user (talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
This page is about a linguistic term. If you are looking for a Nymph of Greek mythology, see Onomatopoeia (Mythology)
“Onomatopoeia? That's the noise my cat makes when he pisses on the rug.”
~ Oscar Wilde on Onomatopoeia
Roy Lichtenstein Whaam

Roy Lichtenstein's "Whaam!" proving how onomatopoeia can be artsy. His marchand convinced him not naming the picture Onomatopoeia #1

Onomatopoeia is a word

COUGH! COUGH! COUGH!

Sorry, they say that is gained from living through the autumn years... Onomatopoeia is a word that

SPLOSH!!!

Christ, there goes my drink, all over my desk. Let me just clean this up

SQUISH! SQUISH! SQUISH!

Right, what was I saying? Oh, right, the onomatopoeia. Ugly word, isn't it? Onomatopoeia is a word that resembles the sound that it is intended to

...................FFFFFOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM!!!

Whatta... Damn truck, how can I write this with such noise? One second, stay right there, let me just close my window.

CLANK!!!

Okay, no interruptions now.

I said "represent", okay? ONOMATOPOEIA IS A WORD THAT RESEMBLES THE SOUND THAT IT IS INTENDED TO REPRESENT!

Oooooof!

Sorry I get a bit over excited at times, but anyway, I've made it! The introduction is over. Now let's talk about

POWPOWPOWPOWPOWPOWPOW!

POW? What the hell is going on?! Did New Year's Eve come early this year or something? There's too much excitement out on the streets. Whatever, they should be testing the fireworks.

Kerplop

What in the hell produces a Ker-Plop sound? Batman TV Show!

Ambrosius! Shut up! Stupid dog, afraid of fireworks... All right, this reminds me of the next subject. One interesting thing about onomatopoeia is that these words are written in different ways for different languages. For instance, this dog of mine is not so stupid as you may think. Ambrosius, can you please bark in Korean?

MEONG! MEONG! MEONG!

See? Funny, isn't it? You may think it's disgusting to eat a dog that woofs but I guess a dog that meongs is pretty yummy, don't think so, Ambrosius?

OOWNNN! OOWNNNN! OOWNNNN!

Ha ha ha, I was just kidding, silly doggy.

SCHLEP! SCHLEP! SCHLEP!

Oh, great, now the keyboard is flooded with dog dribble. Let's get rid of this mess quick. Okay, where was I? Oh, of course, the comics!

THWIP!
Spider-Man! No, no, no, no, no, Parker, please, get out! You're adding an undesired effect of random humor to my article, okay? Nice, you're very polite, I don't want to even think what would have happened if it was Wolverine instead. Okay, yes, comic books use this stuff, but you will never see the word "onomatopoeia" in any of them, hope you understand why. Well, maybe that snob hippie smart-ass Allan Moore could write it - and, for instance, he never uses any onomatopoeia in his oh-so-graphic-novels. Now let's see, what more could I say? Hmmm... Oh, hmmm, and oh are also cases of onomatopoeia but the word "onomatopoeia" itself is not onomatopoeia. That's a little uncreative, don't you think so? How onomatopoeia should be spelled as in an onomatopoeic way?
clickclickclick
the sound of its being typed? But when you say it, how would you represent the sound of the sound being spoken?... Ah, now I'm getting confused. Now to the practical examples:
Nuclear explosion ar

What? Were you waiting for something along with this nuke explosion? Mental onomatopoeia, that's the word, unsophisticated dimwit. Too much abstract for you, ain't it? Alright, alright, I concede it. Here it goes:

Pow!

Too late? Don't you know the sound comes after the light? You would hear the nuke exploding several seconds after the flash. Gosh, I have to explain everything... Okay, okay, let's try it with synchronized sound. For your pleasure, I've prepared a booze of onomatopoeia. First round:


So, you already knew that one? Congrats, pal, I supposed that thing above was completely obscure... Round two of two then. From the renowned linguist Julius Larossa, his PhD thesis on musical usage of onomatopoeia. There it is:


Thank you for reading and watching.....

CRASH!

(damn door.)


190px-Featured.png

Potatohead aqua Featured Article  (read another featured article) Featured version: 14 January 2007
This article has been featured on the front page. — You can vote for or nominate your favourite articles at Uncyclopedia:VFH.
<includeonly>Template:FA/14 January 2007Template:FA/2007</includeonly>
Personal tools
In other languages
projects