Budding

From Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding
A cell undergoing asexual reproduction (1x magnification).

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Budding is a form of asexual reproduction carried out by individuals who are unable to get dates. In the early stages, a pustule forms and grows on the body of the host. The child feeds on its parent's nutrients like a parasite; in this respect it is much like an ordinary teenager. Eventually, the child detaches from its host and forages on its own. Offspring created through budding are identical in every way to their parents, throwing a medium-to-large-sized monkey wrench into the nature-vs.-nurture debate. Budding is certainly a bubbly and pleasantly surprising way to populate the world of tomorrow.

The capability to bud is signaled by acne, detected with the swab test. While skin breakouts typically clear up before humans enter the reproductive stages, some humans, termed nerds, have the condition for long enough to begin active breeding from the face and torso. This encumberment accounts for geeks' stereotypical poor balance and eyesight, but the U.S. army has forged ahead in breeding geek armies to defend the continent despite this setback. The exploitation of geeks in this fashion is beyond the pale of the general consciousness, which has hitherto assumed geeks to procreate with their computers.

In plants, the budding mechanism developed as an evolutionary reaction to the Egyptian seed-preying malark, an insect noted for its deft and perfectly uniform consumption of all seeds. The malark pandemic is visible in the sedimentary records as a five-centimetre-thick, unbroken layer of high-grade coal. In a matter of only centuries, fringe root-heads or haploid-haters effected the evolutionary move to a budding system with the now-immortal "save our seedlings" chant, covered by Pop Me Barry albums in 1992 and again in 1996. The more effective and aesthetically sensible method of asexual reproduction, really a rather reasonable request for living things which had tragically relied on artificial reproductive assistance from prosthetic wasps, is very successful. It is only observable at night, while the plants are breathing and stealing our oxygen, though.

Having previously assumed that budding occurs only in humans and plants, biologists have discovered cases of it occurring in the animal kingdom, notably in sea crabs, night otters, morose shellfish, and scheloeptera vitae or the common shouting snail.

Personal tools
projects